Best Landscape Improvements to Increase the Value of Your Property.

With spring weather and longer days, pedestrian-friendly outdoor spaces are back in business.

For many properties, landscaped open spaces pulls the business together. Open air verandas, greenways for biking and interconnected systems of nature paths and walkways can often become the heartbeat of your campus.

Our harsh winter, however, may have left your grounds in need of repair. Excess water, from abundant snow melt can lead to drainage problems above and below the surface. Sunken pavers or damaged pavements and cracks in retaining walls are problems that are easy to spot on a walk-through.

Sometimes issues that are minor are more extensive that you might think. We can diagnose potential problems and help you decide what to tackle first.

To keep it simple, we recommend the following list of freshening projects and repair solutions that will deliver the greatest return on your investment. 

Plant more trees: Trees are one of the few plants that continue to add sustainable economic value, long after other plants outlive their peak performance. They absorb pollutants, improve air quality, regulate air temperature, and their root systems add nutrients to the soil and anchor the landscape to reduce rates of erosion.

Reimagine lawns: High performing lawn alternatives include replacing traditional or under-utilized lawn areas with perennial meadows, planting foot-friendly ground covers, and installing wide herbaceous borders planted with ornamental grasses and shrubs to add interest.

Improve outdoor work spaces:  On corporate sites, outdoor rooms, covered patios, terraces, above grade decks, and recreational amenities are shaping the new integrated work space.  Bocce ball and sports courts, roof top gardens, and courtyards encourage employee social interaction and productivity.  Privacy screens using strategic plant material provide quiet work area alternatives and warm weather collaboration space.

Reduce environmental impacts:

Pedestrian friendly is also bike friendly. Bolster the health benefits your stakeholders receive from your property with bike paths, racks and storage areas. Use reclaimed masonry and lumber to refresh built elements; monitor water usage through high tech digital systems; control drainage and erosion problems to protect ground water quality; restore habitat areas to attract pollinators and beneficial insects; and modify streams to protect estuaries, and riparian corridors.

Create accessibility:

ADA-compliant improvements in benches, walkways, ramps, and parking surfaces help corporate properties be inclusive to all individuals. Rehabilitate facades, upgrade signage, walkways and medians, with improved safety lighting will significantly increase market value.

Boost image:

The exterior of your building is the first impression people have. Exterior areas that are inviting, interactive, and vibrant with flowers and trees, and use an interesting mix of building materials, send a message that speaks to the quality and spirit of your brand while complementing the look and feel of your property.

Get LEED® certified:

Landscape improvements can qualify for LEED® by improving soil, addressing water efficiency and drainage, and the strategic use of plants and trees.  Our ecologically sound principles for maintenance, and maintenance practices, which include the proper application and use of nutrients and chemical alternatives to reduce toxicity, are critical to achieving green credits for energy efficiency.

As corporate campuses adapt to changing needs, ELM can help property owners and managers revitalize landscapes and assist in the planning of hardscape improvements to coordinates with other site infrastructure upgrades, as well as implement programs for annual repair and maintenance.

For more information on re-energizing your landscape, support LEED® goals, or simply to offer your employees a thriving integrated outdoor space, contact Bruce Moore Jr., vice president operations at 203.316.5433

Photo caption:  Ecological restoration projects are win-wins that benefit habitat biodiversity and serve corporate sustainability goals.  ELM created a healthier waterway in this stream reclamation project by re-directing the creek’s flow, re-building the stream bed and its banks as part of a drainage swale project for Oracle Corporation in Stamford. © ELM.

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Hard Times for Tulips

Just when we thought spring was finally here, freakish weather hit everyone’s favorite flower and brought with it a late leaf-out of landscape trees and shrubs.

While the damage can be upsetting, all is not lost. In many cases, replacing or pruning out dead or injured plant material is the best course of action, especially if the plants or stems have died back.

If your landscape has experienced late winter trauma, we recommend:

  • Spread nutrient-dense mulch around plants to hold warmth in the soil and protect roots.
  • Assess and prune damaged plants once there is no longer a risk of frost.
  • Aerate lawns, sod or seed bare spots.
  • Set up lawn and plant health care program.
  • Clean up and divide perennial foliage, and thin roots.
  • Prune shrubs damaged by frost before any new growth appears.
    Clean up left over leaves and debris from winter storms to keep landscape free of pathogens, mold and decomposed material.
  • Cut back ornamental grasses to prep for spring growth.
  • Apply pre-emergent herbicide to beds when temps warm and before seeds germinate.
  • Spray susceptible trees and shrubs with non-toxic products to prevent disease and infestation.
  • Assess drainage problems and look for potential ground water issues and fix.
  • Run sprinkler systems to adjust for optimum coverage and inspect for leaks.
  • Check sprinkler heads for damage by weather, equipment, or burrowing animals.
  • Repair broken outdoor lighting that took abuse in the winter.
  • Upgrade outdoor outlets with safety devices.
  • Upgrade obsolete irrigation systems with automatic, Wi-Fi controlled systems and to comply with local water restrictions.

ELM’s customer support team cares deeply about the success of your landscape and is at the forefront of making sure your spring starts off on the right foot.

If you have any questions about the health and well-being of your landscape, contact ELM operations vice president

Bruce Moore Sr. Honored with Lifetime Achievement Award

Few executives have had more impact on the improvement of young peoples’ lives than Bruce Moore, Sr.  The founder and CEO of Eastern Land Management, a prominent regional landscape services firm, has devoted untold hours and resources over four decades to the Boys & Girls Club of Stamford, Conn. On March 28, 2018, at its annual City Chic banquet, recognized Bruce with the organization’s Lifetime Achievement Award.

Bruce’s influence in the community extends further than his work on behalf of kids.  What sets Bruce apart is his commitment to work behind the scenes for nothing other than the pride of having contributed to the greater good.

Bruce’s company, ELM, hit its 40th anniversary milestone in 2016 and running it keeps him and his management team busy. His firm is listed among the Top 100 most successful landscape firms in the nation.

In his presenting the award, Bruce Moore Jr. offered these remarks: “… my father’s life is one lived by principle and passion, and a quest to improve the lives of others.  As past president of the Umbrella Club, a local charity which donates funds to children with major medical challenges, he raised over $3 million for local children and hospitals.  A few years back, my father inspired me to become involved with the Boys & Girls Club of Stamford and help them with their fundraising efforts, including chairing the annual ICON Golf Sponsorship Committee.  Today, our company not only sponsors the Club’s annual golf fundraiser, but also City Chic and the Stamford Boys & Girls Corporate 5k. My father spent his lifetime working to improve the future of Stamford’s children.  Tonight, I am pleased to present him with our 2018 Stamford Boys & Girls Club’s Lifetime Achievement Award!”

What unites us, said Bruce Sr. in accepting the award, is in our collective ability to make a difference.   The more we have, the more we have an opportunity to use our gifts and our experience to make ‘giving back’ a pillar of our greater purpose.

Eastern Land Management offers a full range of commercial landscape, grounds and winter services to the northern market of New York City, Connecticut’s Fairfield County and New York’s Westchester County.

As part of ELM’s commitment to serve the growing needs of its Fairfield customers, as well as deliver unmatched asset value advantage for property and facility managers, and school and university campuses alike, ELM is scheduled to open a conveniently-located new service hub in Monroe, CT, in June, 2018.

To learn more about ELM, contact Bruce Moore, Jr., vice president of operations, 203-316-5433.

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Photo L-R: Bruce Moore Sr. and Bruce Moore Jr.

 

 

 

 

5 Reasons Property & Facility Managers Find Increased Value with ELM

It’s a question every building manager and buyer of landscape services asks: “am I getting my money’s worth?”

We know that there are lots of reasons a customer might choose to partner with us, but what we’ve found in over 40 years doing what we do best, the reason is essentially this:  exceptional service, competitive pricing, and quality work.

All things being equal, most good landscape contractors do the same things.  Like us, they invest in the right tools, continuous training, and substantive programs to stay ahead of the curve on problems and solutions.  But here’s where we think we’re different and why we think this matters in a way that helps you and your property perform at its best.

The difference between good and great

Our goal to become a great company means that we are always moving forward.  We know greatness is not easily achieved but the process of becoming great is something everyone at ELM works at. Even better, every one of our team members can tell you how we define greatness and what they do to help drive it. To us, having fun as a team, helping people advance their careers, serving our communities, and volunteering for causes we believe in, makes us feel like we’re the luckiest company in the world. It’s this sense of gratitude that we bring to our relationships with every individual we are lucky enough to work with and for.

Dedicated and personal service

Going beyond is more than a tagline, it means that we understand your businesses, your strategic goals, and we work to help you get where you need to be.  We also know that you’re busy. This means we don’t waste a lot of time and money on unnecessary tasks. We respect what’s on your plate, and believe that great service requires a give AND take, not give or take.

A history of forward thinking, proactivity

As a privately-held, family-owned business, we are independent and nimble and believe that agility has kept us relevant in periods of uncertainty. Our ability to adapt and deliver value at all times is part of who we are. It is a mindset that helps us meet your needs in an ever-changing market and prepares us to stay out in front of trends in our own industry, as well.

Knowledge-based solutions

Our experience matters. We view our role as more than being just your service partner. As a curator of your most important asset, our smarter workflow will enable a better return on your investment, deliver better results, and we’ll always be on the lookout for opportunities to improve your outdoor environment as a healthier place to live, work and play.

Safety first risk management

Working with heavy equipment and seasonal weather patterns means that your landscape and grounds can suffer if risk management is not properly addressed. Optimizing safety, reducing liability, and managing risk is what our teams train for.  In fact, the health and well-being of our customers’ properties, their employees, tenants and guests, is our top priority.  We recognize that risk is an inherent component of all outdoor work, so we place a priority making sure safety is always first.  This includes having a highly-trained winter crew, experienced emergency, storm and blizzard responders, and on-call seasonal support.

Stamford, CT.-based Eastern Land Management offers a full range of commercial landscape, grounds and winter services to the northern market of New York City, Connecticut’s Fairfield County and New York’s Westchester County.

As part of ELM’s commitment to serve the growing needs of its Fairfield customers, as well as deliver unmatched asset value advantage for property and facility managers, and school and university campuses alike, ELM is scheduled to open a conveniently-located new service hub in Monroe, CT, in June, 2018.

To learn more about large scale landscape contracting or to just talk about a long-overdue upgrade, contact Bruce Moore, Jr., vice president of operations, 203-316-5433.

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Behind The Scenes: Keeping Your Site Safe.

A safe and incident-free winter experience relies on trained crews who work hard shifts and long nights. While property managers and tenants are sleeping, teams of accomplished snow and ice professionals are inspecting and clearing grounds, parking lots, curb areas, and walkways to make sure outside areas are hazard free and pedestrian-safe.

Winter jobs can be among the most tough. “During our recent ‘snowpocalyse’, ELM plow crews in powerful equipment worked two 16-hour shifts, from 4 in the morning to 10 at night to reduce client risk,” said Bruce Moore, Jr., operations vice president. “Ongoing training makes all the difference in the ability to deliver.”

To keep performance expectations high, ELM invests in SIMA (Snow & Ice Management Association)-accredited training programs for advanced snow management professionals.

“ELM is all about putting our reputation on the line for quality and safety, and every member of our team is working together towards a common goal,” said Bruce. “Currently we have three Advanced Snow Managers, a specialized fleet of more than 100 snow removal machines and equipment, weather forecasting technology, and at least 200 trained people who take pride in keeping more than 1 million square feet of commercial properties clear and accessible.  That’s the most impressive thing to me,” he added.

To learn more ELM’s winter services and emergency response strategies, go to: https://www.easternland.com/our-services/snow-services/

Or contact Bruce Moore @ 203.316.5433.

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Jeffrey Wilson Promoted to Area Manager

Eastern Land Management is pleased to announce Jeff Wilson’s promotion to Area Manager, effective January 2018.

Since starting with ELM in November 2016 as Field Manager, Jeff has consistently been recognized for his outstanding performance. His thoughtful approach to finding solutions to unusual challenges make him a valuable addition to ELM’s client services team.

Jeff’s primary focus will be to serve the hospitality, corporate campus and residential community sectors to ensure that ELM’s landscape teams provide increasing value and asset appreciation.

A Greenwich, Connecticut native, Jeff is committed to empowering the ELM brand he represents and increasing its success. Jeff prides himself in his ability to represent best in class quality, fostering great relationships, and staying ahead of trends.

Please join us in congratulating Jeff on his well-deserved promotion

 

George Brown III Named Business Developer

Eastern Land Management is pleased to announce the appointment of George Brown III to the role of Business Developer.  George will work closely with the company’s Chief Executive and Vice President Operations, and will be responsible for identifying and leading strategic growth initiatives and driving revenue for all ELM’s commercial landscape and snow services.

Prior to this promotion, George served as ELM’s area manager.  George brings 20 years of business experience and landscape industry knowledge to his new role and is taking on this responsibility at a time when ELM is focused on organic growth and building and attracting the best team in the industry.

Commenting on the promotion, ELM’s Vice President Operations, Bruce Moore, Jr., said, “George is a top performer and strategic thinker who understands the market in which we operate and our aspirations as a business. We look forward to him leading opportunities to partner more closely with clients and pursue positive leads that come our way.”

George attended the University at Buffalo and the State University of New York College of Agriculture and Technology at Cobleskill where he received a B.S. in Landscape Contracting.

Eastern Land Management is located in Stamford, Connecticut and has been providing commercial landscape services to property and facility managers since 1976.  easternland.com

Why Prune in Winter?

One of the easiest and most effective ways to promote your property’s value is to put your deciduous shrubs and small trees on a seasonal care program that includes structural pruning in winter.

Structural pruning, or pruning designed to ensure a sound structure and aesthetic form, is done during a plant’s dormancy for a number of reasons.  It gets young shrubs and trees off to a good start, removes dead or stressed wood, encourages healthy flowering and foliage in the spring, and improves their ability to survive storms.

Pruning in early winter will protect your trees and shrubs from the toll that heavy ice and snow can take when the weight of snow on branches can break limbs and cause damage to your landscape or liability and safety concerns.

ELM believes that proper pruning is an essential part of an overall commitment to the health of your landscape, a best practice that includes a regular program of soil nutrition, root zone conditioning, smart watering, insect and disease prevention, and plant health care.

Depending on which species of small trees and shrubs on your property, ELM’s pruning team will be identifying which plants on your property will make the cut and why.

If there are holly trees and shrubs on your site, you’re in luck. Cutting hollies back in December means the plant gets a new shape and the clipped branches make jolly holiday decorations.  Just ask. We’ll save some trimmings for you.

ELM’s dormant pruning principles:

  1. Supports disease management
  2. Creates a healthy canopy for spring
  3. Delivers more aesthetic results
  4. Improves spring growth, flowering and foliage
  5. Improves ability to withstand weather events and storms
  6. Proactively supports safety and liability by removing weak branches

For questions on landscape health in winter, or to schedule dormant pruning, please contact Bruce Moore, Jr., vice president, operations at 203-316-5433.

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Welcome Patrick McClellan, New ELM Area Manager

Eastern Land Management, an award-winning, full-service commercial landscape company located in Stamford, Connecticut, is pleased to welcome Patrick (Pat) McClellan to ELM as a new Area Manager.

In his new role, Pat will work closely with commercial real estate managers to develop landscape health and safety plans, coordinate field operations, and manage scope and budget for properties he serves.

“We are fortunate to add someone of Pat’s passion to the ELM team; his expertise will be a real asset to us and to our customers,” said Bruce Moore, Jr., vice president, operations.

A native of Long Island, Pat attended State University of New York, Farmingdale, where he pursued a teaching credential before switching to SUNY’s landscape and ornamental horticulture program.  He holds a OSHA 30 license, and is a CT/NY-licensed pesticide operator.

“The best advice I could give any property manager would be to measure the value of sustainability,” notes Pat. “The ideal landscape is one that allows the beauty of the natural and built environment but strategically minimizes the disruption of its resources.  Some people feel going green costs more money, but conservation is an investment that reaps savings – and improves property asset value – over time.”

Well said, Patrick. Welcome to our team.

easternland.com

203.316.5433

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How Weather Data is Transforming Landscape and Snow Service Decisions

Bad weather can be bad for business. For property managers, winter storms in particular can significantly impact operations and affect revenue.

To help productivity and improve safety, ELM has invested in emerging weather research to provide you with weather planning as a strategic piece of your overall landscape budget.

“Being able to collect and apply information locally has opened up opportunities for us to improve communications and service timelines as we apply what we learn to be proactive about potential impacts,” said Bruce Moore Sr., who leads the ELM’s hazard and risk planning initiative.  “We know we can’t manage the weather but we can manage the financial implications of what weather can do if we’re not prepared for it,” he added.

Being responsible for the safety of commercial landscape and outdoor environments is mission-critical for ELM’s front line team who ensure that your business is taken care of while your workforce, tenants or campus remains safe.

“ELM’s hazard planning minimizes the disruption of our customer’s business, reduces insurance claims made by injured employees and customers, lowers exposure and increases the safety of everyone,” noted Bruce.

Technology has improved accuracy in predicting extreme weather and is providing exponentially more benefits to property managers looking to address emergency preparedness and site safety. Whether it’s the next generation of radar, new mobile applications, remote weather sensors that manage water conservation, or using forecasts to save money, more accurate predictions makes running a commercial landscape asset easier all year long.
ELM is committed to creating safer communities by protecting life and property, and managing risk.  To learn more about ELM’s weather service, contact Bruce Moore, Sr., Founder & CEO at 203-316-5433.

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Photo: The Connecticut River photographed from Conard weather balloon, a student-driven project of the Frederick U. Conard School’s STEM (science, technology, engineering and math) program. ELM applauds students throughout Connecticut for the work they are doing in the pursuit of knowledge and understanding.