Christopher Koenig Joins ELM as Area Manager

West Haven, Connecticut native Chris Koenig says the green industry is a perfect fit for him because he’s loved the outdoors since he was a kid.

With passions ranging from ice hockey to ice fishing, Chris is well-positioned to lead Eastern Land Management’s cold weather crews on ice and snow management, in addition to his role advancing service delivery to ELM clients throughout Fairfield County.

Chris’s journey to area manager began at the ground level, as a gardener. “The cutting edge of what we do as landscapers starts with the soil. Getting our hands dirty, nurturing and improving plant health, dealing with insects and the weather, and making sure all the dots connect on everybody’s needs. Front line ‘boots-on-the-ground’ work is a tough assignment. But it’s great on-the-job training,” said Chris.

Chris has held several landscaping positions over a dozen years, from field operations to production and customer service.  “Chris’ experience is inspiring,” said company president, Bruce Moore Jr. “When people work their way up, they can be phenomenal leaders. Chris’ crews respect his understanding of their jobs and customers value his impressive impact as a problem-solver.”

Please join us in welcoming Chris to ELM.

Leading From the Heart

Our company’s core reason for being is to be a force for good. Whether it’s creating value by giving back to our communities or strengthening our environmental stewardship or finding new ways to channel innovation, our success ultimately depends on the quality of the impact we have on the world around us.

As ELM expands its vision to make what we do more meaningful, eight things have become part of our organization’s practice:

  • We’re addressing environmental stewardship to reduce costs, improve water efficiency and soil health, and paying attention to improving biodiversity and minimizing waste.
  • We’re investing in ways to play a leading role in our snow and landscape industry’s transition to a lower-carbon economy.
  • We’re approaching environmental risk and reduced impacts by a combination of improved snow and landscape practices that protect and conserve water and natural resources.
  • We’re rethinking our operational footprint with an eye to a clean energy future.
  • We’re partnering across our communities with organizations and stakeholders that share our sense of commitment and accountability to positive impact.
  • We’re helping our workforce link their passions and strengths through training and opportunity.
  • We’re making the impact of our work more visible in the community.
  • We’re building a culture that values purpose, brings enthusiasm and collaboration to work, and and keeps purpose at the top of everyone’s mind, every day.

We are grateful for the people at ELM who go above and beyond to make a difference in the lives of others; for the culture of appreciation that is the backbone of our workplace, and to our clients and friends whose well-being, energy and engagement continue to inspire our path forward.

To learn more about ELM’s commitment to build a company that makes a difference, contact President Bruce Moore Jr. at (203) 316-5433.

 

 

 

 

Bruce Moore Jr. Joins First County Bank as Corporator

First County Bank, headquartered in Stamford, Connecticut, has named Bruce Moore Jr., president, Eastern Land Management, to its board of corporators.

The position of corporator is offered to community representatives and thought leaders who bring direct insights into the needs of business.

In this role, Bruce will join a unique group of community leaders with diverse backgrounds who together will play a critical role as centers of influence.

“Doing more together is a key pillar of ELM’s culture and community engagement is where it starts,” said Bruce.  “As landscape professionals, we’re trained to develop a deep understanding of broader needs. I look forward to collaborating with this remarkable group to increase the visibility of our business community, drive social impact and support the bank’s commitment to the needs of its customers.”

Eastern Land Management (ELM) serves the commercial real estate industry throughout Connecticut and Greater New York Metro. The company was founded in Stamford, Connecticut, in 1976 by Bruce Moore Sr. Bruce Moore Jr. became president in 2019. ELM received the ChangeMaker Award from Fairfield County in 2019 for its action on sustainability.

Bruce graduated with a degree in business management from Curry College in Milton, Massachusetts, and is active in the greater business and commercial real estate community.

About First County Bank

First County Bank, headquartered in Stamford, CT for 170 years, is an independent mutual community bank with 16 branches in Stamford, Norwalk, Darien, Greenwich, Fairfield, New Canaan and Westport offering deposit products, mortgages, wealth management, business banking services, and a full array of digital banking products including mobile and online banking. First County Bank has more than 220 employees, assets in excess of $1.9 billion and is a winner of the Hearst Connecticut Top Work Places 2020-2021 award. For additional information, please visit www.firstcountybank.com, or follow us @Firstcountybank on FacebookInstagramTwitter, and LinkedIn.

 

 

 

 

ELM Rolls Out Landscape Platform for Senior Living

A new health care model is reshaping senior living as residential communities continue to raise the bar on amenities and innovation that improve the quality of life.

As this property market looks to a future where the population of seniors with incremental health care needs is growing, updating facility landscaping for aesthetics, and health and safety are no longer capital expenditures that can be put on hold.

ELM has identified five ways to prioritize improvements.

  • Update entrances and pedestrian areas for safety and flow
  • Create plant-filled, interactive outdoor spaces to heighten community engagement, support walking and fitness programs, and add curb appeal
  • Identify opportunities to transform underperforming areas into low-maintenance nature or activity spaces for bocce ball, croquet or putting greens.
  • Create a community garden, rooftop top garden, a composting center, or rain garden to create more opportunities for residents to engage over shared activities.
  • Create a tech-enabled, environmentally-friendly, resource-efficient and climate appropriate landscape maintenance program that reduces long-term costs and use practices that conserve water, energy, and soil health, limit waste and protect groundwater.

ELM’s team is experienced in this sector and understands its unique needs. Recently, we performed a complete makeover that included the installation a digitally controlled smart irrigation system, the natural pruning of dozens of shrubs and trees, layers of fresh mulch, splashes of seasonal color, and a refreshed entrance.

Enhancement Manager and project lead, Bobby Papotto, says, “Our connection with nature improves well-being and nowhere is this more important that when it comes to the specific needs of senior living residents, whether the facility is for independent living, assisted living or memory care. To make sure our landscapes support a range of quality of life goals, we look at soil health, plant material, biodiversity and habitat, and incorporate as much nature and natural elements, and safety features into the design and execution as possible.”

Landscaped spaces are an oasis for community engagement and safe socializing, and spending time in a healthy outdoor environment can make all the difference when it comes to choosing a senior community.

To learn more about ways landscaping can create an enhanced sense of community, contact ELM President, Bruce Moore Jr., at 203-316-5433.

 

 

Celebrating 45 Years of Trust & Growth

“Every decade has its detours,” says ELM founder and landscape industry legend, Bruce Moore Sr. “From good times to lean times, we learned to adapt. The pandemic, and a fire we had a few years ago that wiped out our archives, was nearly just another day at the office,” he added with the wisdom born of time and persistence, and a willingness to work very hard at what he loved.

ELM recently celebrated its 45th year in business and Bruce Sr. says, “agility is our middle name.”  Like a lot of entrepreneurs, Bruce Sr. had a broad focus starting out and discovered his survival kit along the way.

“Adaptability became our strong suit,” he said, “as the only thing that was constant in those days was change. We were good at keeping customers and building relationships, and it was the relationships that kept us in business.”

Fast forward to 2021, and it’s clear that relationships continue to drive the company’s collective success. Not only does ELM still have some of its original – going on four-decade relationships, but the company’s service quality and consistency keeps its customer retention at nearly 95%.  Which, given quarantines and confinements, and a chronology of unprecedented events that unfolded in real time, is a remarkable lesson for business leaders.

Today, ELM is proud to have had the foresight to invest in developing a high performing team.  “Even in the midst of turbulence, we’ve always had an ‘all for one, one for all’ spirit,” says Bruce Sr. “We were lucky then – and we’re lucky now – that we built a company of trust and ideas, so when push came to shove, we could improvise quickly and push through together.”

The result is impressive. ELM reaches across Connecticut with a multi-branch operation and an engaging workforce where team members trust the people they work with and are willing to collaborate on the next big thing.

As it turns out, team spirit is critical to the firm’s ability to pivot.  “I credit Bruce Jr. for embracing uncertainty and inspiring ELM to adapt to new normal realities,” says the proud father of the firm’s next generation leader who is ushering in new, innovative ideas, green technologies, and concepts for growth.

ELM mandates contingency planning as part of its operational strategy and the ability to switch gears is built into its culture.

“Working in the New England snow belt, we’re already aligned with the fluctuations of nature. We expect the weather to change. We plan for plant life cycles and seasons and weather events, and are always assessing risk and economies of scale. If you know anything about nature, even with technology forecasting, she can be imprecise. So, we have to be on our toes and proactive. Just like getting out in front of change in business, nature demands a fast and super-flexible response. Our training to do that well has become our value-add,” said Bruce Jr.

For more than four decades, ELM has kept the company going with its integrity and an ‘all hands on deck’ spirit at the helm.  With the firm’s half-century mark on the horizon, ELM continues to think beyond what’s possible.

“Creating a new future for what we do, without compromising what made us who we are, is our new leadership imperative.”

Over the next few months, ELM will be rolling out its legacy for the future. “With the health crisis more or less behind us, and enthusiasm for revitalized landscapes in all its forms – parks, open spaces, habitats, green roofs, and amenity zones – benefitting from a pent-up demand for being outside, we don’t want to lose sight of what made us great. Because what brought us here, will take us forward,” said Bruce Jr.

What inspired ELM back in the day – the solid relationships, the decision-making that helped the company think through challenge, and the firm’s strong commitment to people and community – that, and the high value support from all levels of its team, that’s the advantage ELM says they will always bring to the table.

Eastern Land Management was founded in Connecticut in 1976 by Bruce T. Moore Sr. Under the leadership of its president Bruce T. Moore Jr., ELM is one of the northeast region’s leading provider of commercial landscape, water management and snow services.

Bruce Moore Jr. is an active member of the National Association of Landscape Professionals, the Snow and Ice Management Association, Southern Connecticut BOMA, Bridgeport Economic Development Council, a member of the board of directors for the Fairfield County House, and a former long-time member of the board of the Stamford Boys & Girls Club. As a team and company, ELM is a committed corporate citizen and community partner, and shares time and resources to support organizations and people in need.

For its efforts in advanced water management and resource conservation, ELM was honored in 2019 with the Fairfield County ChangeMaker Award for Sustainability.

To learn more, go to: www.easternland.com or contact ELM President, Bruce Moore Jr., at (203) 316-5433.

 

ELM Celebrates the Light at The End of The Tunnel

There’s an art to approaching the holidays and one of our favorite ways to bring a sense of pause, especially after a challenging year, is to create a little magic with lights.  Lots of them.

“Across Connecticut and Greater NYC Metro, lighting installations are a fun and easy way to boost morale,” said Bruce Moore, Jr., ELM president, who reports an increase in lighting demand as technology has made lighting a safe, and more energy- and cost-efficient way to spark joy.

With limits on public gatherings and traditional festivities dialed back, brightly lit streets and plazas are one tradition that allows people to celebrate safely and from a distance.

To learn more about ELM’s energy-efficient holiday lighting program, and ways commercial-grade lighting can boost goodwill for your business and community, contact Bruce Moore Jr. at 203-316-5433.