Summer 2020 Outdoor Watering Schedule Returns for Darien, Greenwich, New Canaan, Newtown, Stamford and Westport Connecticut

With summer’s high water demands and another year of below average rainfall, large portions of Connecticut are experiencing and extended dry conditions and near record water demands, and Southwest Fairfield County has been classified as drought sensitive.

As a result, Aquarion Water Company has placed a mandatory irrigation schedule for its customers in Darien, Greenwich, New Canaan, Newtown, Stamford and Westport, Connecticut. The schedule limits landscape irrigation systems to a maximum of twice weekly.

Here’s how it works:

  • Twice-weekly restrictions will apply to both in-ground systems and above-ground sprinklers. 
  • Drip irrigation systems, soaker hoses and manual watering are exempt.
  • Aquarion Water Company customers can file for a variance to allow for additional watering time if the property is: 1) larger than two acres or 2) qualifies as an irrigation-efficient by utilizing smart weather-based irrigation controller technology.

ELM’s water technology meets exemption criteria:

ELM’s water and resource conservation program includes a strategic partnership with Weathermatic®, a global leader in digital water technologies. This means ELM has the water conservation tools commercial property managers need to advance irrigation efficiency, collect real time water data (quantity and quality), and use that data to save water and cost.

Eight ways to conserve water outdoors:

  • Create a drought-tolerant landscape plant palette.
  • Enhance soil hydration through mulching, amendments and hydrogels
  • Convert underperforming turf to meadows with perennials and ornamental grasses.
  • Adopt digital innovation technologies to improve water use performance.
  • Make sure that your irrigation system is part of your building operation’s financial dashboard system.
  • Install smart water technology, to manage water distribution, gauge irrigation requirements, and save on water costs.
  • Use proper irrigation methods to improve system efficiencies. 
  • Install pressure-regulating devices, which apply water directly to plants, and high-efficiency nozzles or other devices, such as drip system alternatives, as conservation measures.

ELM’s commitment to conserve water is a corporate strategy to manage your water better and manage environmental resources better. Learn how your journey toward intelligent water use can be expedited through smart water technologies and what steps you can take to be in compliance with water mandates.

Contact Jamie Gorton,ELM’s resource conservation expert at 203-316-5433. 

Welcoming Students Back. A landscape blueprint for campus health & safety

Schools are reopening for summer in Connecticut with restrictions for health and safety. Among these are guidelines for health and safety and protocols for precautions to prevent the spread of Covid-19.

We are privileged to work with some of the finest educational institutions in our region and are prepared to take on responsibility to help them ensure the health and safety of their students and staff.

Based on state and federal guidelines and our current understanding of infection control measures, our campus health and safety program now includes a broad range of services that mitigate risk, improve logistics, functionality and delivery, and ensure that school landscape and grounds are sustainable and healthy from the ground up.

  • Athletic fields, high-performance turf installation and care
  • Complete outsource landscape and grounds maintenance package available
  • Custom on-site service schedule
  • Disinfecting and sanitizing services
  • Hardscape construction, renovations, rehabilitation of walkways, and outdoor amenities to meet social distancing requirements
  • Horticultural services
  • Lighting
  • Non-toxic plant health care program
  • Plant disease and pest control
  • Sanitizing and disinfecting services
  • Seasonal color, perennials, gardens for school garden clubs
  • Snow and ice management
  • Stormwater management/bioswales/drainage and grounds stabilization
  • Tree care
  • Uniforms and PPE protocols, and enhanced health and safety training
  • Updated equipment safety and functionality procedures and training
  • Vector-borne disease control, and mosquito/tick habitat reduction
  • Water conservation, water audits, smart irrigation technology and water management

For information on getting your campus ready to welcome students back, to disinfect, deep clean, spruce up your grounds, or upgrade irrigation and drainage, contact ELM President, Bruce Moore Jr., at 203-316-5433. 

Or email at bmoorejr@easternland.comto learn more.

ELM is a full-service landscape and snow and ice contractor, licensed and bonded in the States of Connecticut and New York. 

Photo: ELM is proud to be full-service landscape partner to Sacred Heart University Fairfield County Connecticut.

Let’s Get Re-Building. Tips to make your post-Covid landscape a healthier space to live, work and play.

Making our environment healthier for everyone is likely to be an upside of post-pandemic recovery.

From oxygen-producing street trees to broader walkways and wider spaces, here are ten ways commercial property owners and managers can rehabilitate commercial sites to be more resilient and safer spaces for all.

  1. Widen pedestrian plazas to enable people to spread out.
  2. Construct and protect bicycle paths.
  3. Renovate public gather places, dining terraces, common areas.
  4. Transform underutilized hardscape into landscaped spaces.
  5. Reclaim underperforming landscape areas into broad corridors.
  6. Introduce wide walking trails and sidewalks with lighting, shade trees, and habitat and vector-control buffer zones.
  7. Eliminate redundant landscape infrastructure systems, such as old irrigation grids, and introduce automation and advanced technology to improve cost, eliminate waste and improve resource management.
  8. Optimize amenities as flexible public spaces.
  9. Integrate natural systems, riverbeds, estuaries, habitats, transit areas, medians, and parks at all scales to create a sense of community.
  10. Activate a multi-functional landscape plan that adheres to healthy living/working guidelines and new interaction and safety norms.

Our high-performing teams have been respected members of the integrated landscape design-build and landscape maintenance community for more than 40 years.

Working with general contractors and builders, and directly with building and facility owners and managers to improve project delivery and cost, our full-service framework offers a multitude of ways to get started.

Contact Bruce Moore Jr. at 203-316-5433 or email at bmoorejr@easternland.com.

ELM is licensed and bonded in the States of Connecticut and New York. 

From the Commercial Centers of Metro New York to the Business Communities of Connecticut, ELMs Diversity of Capabilities is on Full Display

In a new corporate video launched today, the impact of ELM’s team mission shows how having a clear purpose and working together maximize our potential to deliver meaningful customer service.

When building teams, ELM seeks people who have great talent, energy and ambition, but also a blend of strengths, functional skills and the capacity to perform around aligned values. 

“Our new video reflects collaboration and choreography at the highest level,” said company president, Bruce Moore Jr. “Commitment to each other, to our clients, to our organization’s bigger picture, and to continued growth as professionals are characteristics of who we are as a company and as a brand.  As we’ve learned and practiced since our company’s founding more than 40 years ago, when we enhance each other, success will follow.”

Check out more meaningful customer service through teamwork video here:

How Innovative Turf Equipment Benefits Your Landscape and Controls Noise

Autonomous equipment is a game changer. Eco-friendly and reliable, robotic mowers are delivering impressive results. For property managers keen on reducing noise, robotic mowers are among a class of next gen options designed to provide a less disruptive landscape maintenance experience.

ELM is currently testing autonomous equipment and plans to use on unique, size-constrained areas, such as green roofs, or to simplify tough mowing jobs, such as clearing vegetation from sloped areas. 

As part of ELM’s ‘future ready’ initiative, Husqvarna robotic mowers will become part of a fleet of smart commercial grade equipment that will help us offer new and existing clients increased efficiency, added safety, and the opportunity to deliver complex and less disruptive turf services in a new way. 

Overall, autonomous vehicles are safer, produce fewer emissions than conventional mowing equipment, and offers specific benefits to property owners seeking environmentally-friendly options for green build or LEED credits. 

ELM is applying green technologies to support our clients’ and our own sustainability goals and robotic mowers are an important next step in flexibility, scalability and improved services. 

To learn more about how advanced technologies can make a difference in your landscape management services, contact Bruce Moore Jr. at 203-316-5433.

Bruce Moore Jr. is “Living for Landscaping”

Capping a first year of leadership success as ELM’s president, Bruce Moore Jr is “Living for Landscaping” in the August issue of Irrigation & Green Industry magazine. Learn how ELM’s strategy for offering exceptional service is winning customers and how everyone at ELM is empowered to drive growth.

https://igin.com/article-7564-Bruce-Moore-Jr-Living-for-landscaping.html?fbclid=IwAR23w5w3edDqzSmV8QC667MBf9K-5PXwQUZ4Xnch5ft2fUMpajme7Z_VkZk

ELM Receives Top Honors from National Association of Landscape Professionals

Eastern Land Management was recognized with two 2018 Awards of Excellence from the National Association of Landscape Professionals for its work at Merritt7 Commercial Office Park, Norwalk CT, and Landmark Square, Stamford, CT.

The annual awards program, now in its 49th year, salutes landscape projects that exemplify the best in their category and address unique areas of expertise and proficiency.

 

“We accept these prestigious awards on behalf of our clients,” said ELM President Bruce Moore Jr. “Our team displays discipline and dedication to their work and this recognition underscores our commitment to continue delivering quality and best practices across our entire service portfolio.”

 

The awards will be presented at the national association’s annual Awards of Excellence ceremony at LANDSCAPES2018, the industry’s annual conference and expo in Louisville KY, October 18, 2018.

 

The landscape competition has grown to be one of the largest of its kind in the nation and reflects the rapidly evolving professionalism that the industry represents.

 

Photo:  Merritt7, the Charles O. Perry sculpture garden.

 

 

09-20-2018

 

 

 

 

 

Green Technologies Help Property Managers Move Toward a Culture of Alternative Fuel Sources and Reduced Environmental Impacts.

ELM recently launched its alternative fuels and advanced engine technology program as an effective way to improve air quality and support commercial property LEED® initiatives.

To support the firm’s fuel forward goals, ELM is working with Mean Green Mowers and Green Works Commercial Equipment on an energy action plan that includes growing its fleet of electric mowers and trimmers.

Beyond the initial focus of reducing environmental impacts on commercial landscapes, ELM is promoting innovation in green performance and value improvements that support higher standards in leaner service cycles, while providing real estate clients with the right information to drive sustainable decisions and make their properties more competitive and attractive for tenants.

 

  • Embracing automation: ELM is working with its suppliers to test and deploy next generation robotic mowers, and use renewable energy and alternative fuels to reduce cost, maintenance and emissions; apply GPS and mobile time tracking software, customer relationship management software, digital communications and reporting tools, to improve performance, and underscore ELM’s sense of responsibility to run a leaner and cleaner operation.
  • Accelerating turn-around. The speed at which ELM can roll out new greener services and technology improves its ability to scale up. ELM is committed to forecasting client needs and investing in proactive team training and tools to improve bottom line goals.
  • Optimizing data for continuous improvement. ELM captures data from benchmarking studies, customer surveys, and process improvements to shape its ability to be faster, more flexible and a more client-centered service company.
  • Increasing efficiencies to become more competitive, cost-effective risk managers. Seasonal weather events, such as hurricanes, blizzards and droughts, drive ELM’s proactive commitment to safety. Weather forecasting software, advanced training for snow/ice and emergency storm response keeps ELM on top of potential risk factors to prevent problems before they happen.
  • Innovating water management to improve environmental concerns. ELM is coordinating with utility companies, manufacturers and conservation specialists to educate its clients about drought and resource management. ELM’s water management program delivers on tight budgets to repair deteriorating irrigation systems and improve conservation metrics with cloud-based technologies designed to improve sustainability profiles, safeguard ground water quality, and reduce annual water costs.

For information on improving your green footprint, assessing the aesthetics of your facility’s open space, implementing sustainable approaches to irrigation, stormwater filtration, or creating a stronger continuity of pedestrian-friendly common areas, contact Vice President, Operations, Bruce Moore, Jr. at 203-316-5433.

Facebook

It’s Tick Season. How Landscape Modifications Can Protect Your Employees.

Tick-borne diseases are an emerging health problem. In fact, the number of people getting diseases from ticks, mosquito and fleas, is on the rise.  In Fairfield County, the Connecticut Department of Public Health is advising its residents to take added tick prevention measures, at home and at work, to avoid the tick-borne Lyme disease.

The best defense is to manage risk. Currently, no vaccines are available in the U.S. against any tick-borne disease so landscape adjustments and the use of integrated pest management are among the most effective ways to reduce exposure, especially on commercial properties featuring high grass, brushy or wooded areas, and areas adjacent to ornamental plantings, walls, and walking trails.

ELM recommends the following tick control measures:

  • Increase buffer zones to increase sunlight, reduce tick habitat, and discourage rodent hosts.
  • Create clean and clearly defined borders between planted areas, beds, and lawns.
  • Cut back wood and brush lines to protect pedestrians from brushing up against vegetation.
  • Introduce mulch or gravel barriers between wooded areas and lawns.
  • Clear brush, debris and leaf litter, especially along edges of walls, driveways, and lawns.
  • Add hardscape, such as stone, tile, and gravel paths to increase tick safe buffer zones.
  • Manage or remove invasive plant species that provide habitat for ticks carrying Lyme disease.
  • Keep lawn areas mowed.
  • Discourage foraging deer by introducing deer-resistant annuals, perennials, shrubs and trees.
  • Apply deer repellents to limit deer feeding territory.
  • Use a safe and sustainable integrated pest management (IPM) program that uses either organic or insecticidal methods to reduce risk, and monitor and control disease-bearing insect populations during summer’s warmer months.

For more information on ELM’s pest, tick, mosquito and flea-management program, contact Vice President, Operations, Bruce Moore, Jr. at 203-316-5433.

Follow us on Facebook

Photo: Adult black legged (deer) tick.

 

Best Landscape Improvements to Increase the Value of Your Property.

With spring weather and longer days, pedestrian-friendly outdoor spaces are back in business.

For many properties, landscaped open spaces pulls the business together. Open air verandas, greenways for biking and interconnected systems of nature paths and walkways can often become the heartbeat of your campus.

Our harsh winter, however, may have left your grounds in need of repair. Excess water, from abundant snow melt can lead to drainage problems above and below the surface. Sunken pavers or damaged pavements and cracks in retaining walls are problems that are easy to spot on a walk-through.

Sometimes issues that are minor are more extensive that you might think. We can diagnose potential problems and help you decide what to tackle first.

To keep it simple, we recommend the following list of freshening projects and repair solutions that will deliver the greatest return on your investment. 

Plant more trees: Trees are one of the few plants that continue to add sustainable economic value, long after other plants outlive their peak performance. They absorb pollutants, improve air quality, regulate air temperature, and their root systems add nutrients to the soil and anchor the landscape to reduce rates of erosion.

Reimagine lawns: High performing lawn alternatives include replacing traditional or under-utilized lawn areas with perennial meadows, planting foot-friendly ground covers, and installing wide herbaceous borders planted with ornamental grasses and shrubs to add interest.

Improve outdoor work spaces:  On corporate sites, outdoor rooms, covered patios, terraces, above grade decks, and recreational amenities are shaping the new integrated work space.  Bocce ball and sports courts, roof top gardens, and courtyards encourage employee social interaction and productivity.  Privacy screens using strategic plant material provide quiet work area alternatives and warm weather collaboration space.

Reduce environmental impacts:

Pedestrian friendly is also bike friendly. Bolster the health benefits your stakeholders receive from your property with bike paths, racks and storage areas. Use reclaimed masonry and lumber to refresh built elements; monitor water usage through high tech digital systems; control drainage and erosion problems to protect ground water quality; restore habitat areas to attract pollinators and beneficial insects; and modify streams to protect estuaries, and riparian corridors.

Create accessibility:

ADA-compliant improvements in benches, walkways, ramps, and parking surfaces help corporate properties be inclusive to all individuals. Rehabilitate facades, upgrade signage, walkways and medians, with improved safety lighting will significantly increase market value.

Boost image:

The exterior of your building is the first impression people have. Exterior areas that are inviting, interactive, and vibrant with flowers and trees, and use an interesting mix of building materials, send a message that speaks to the quality and spirit of your brand while complementing the look and feel of your property.

Get LEED® certified:

Landscape improvements can qualify for LEED® by improving soil, addressing water efficiency and drainage, and the strategic use of plants and trees.  Our ecologically sound principles for maintenance, and maintenance practices, which include the proper application and use of nutrients and chemical alternatives to reduce toxicity, are critical to achieving green credits for energy efficiency.

As corporate campuses adapt to changing needs, ELM can help property owners and managers revitalize landscapes and assist in the planning of hardscape improvements to coordinates with other site infrastructure upgrades, as well as implement programs for annual repair and maintenance.

For more information on re-energizing your landscape, support LEED® goals, or simply to offer your employees a thriving integrated outdoor space, contact Bruce Moore Jr., vice president operations at 203.316.5433

Photo caption:  Ecological restoration projects are win-wins that benefit habitat biodiversity and serve corporate sustainability goals.  ELM created a healthier waterway in this stream reclamation project by re-directing the creek’s flow, re-building the stream bed and its banks as part of a drainage swale project for Oracle Corporation in Stamford. © ELM.

Follow us on Facebook