ELM’s green infrastructure program is tackling urban stormwater.

Stormwater runoff is a leading cause of urban water pollution. When rain, snow, sleet fall on impervious surfaces, such as parking lots, roads, rooftops and other hard surfaces, the water washes off and carries sediment and pollutants on its way into streets and storm drains, and subsequently into rivers and lakes and watershed.

“Green infrastructure – both hardscape and natural systems, such as bioswales, rain gardens and other vegetated biofilters – is a functional, attractive, environmentally-friendly and effective way to reduce the volume and flow of runoff,” said Bobby Papotto, ELM’s enhancement manager, who is overseeing a large-scale stormwater project in Westchester County NY.

“After Hurricane Ida came through last year, there was massive flooding, roadway erosion and safety issues due to collapsed shoring and insufficient filtration systems.  We began the project as a storm response effort, working with local engineering teams and the town’s permitting department to build a new retaining wall and a complex swale filtration system using a mix of sand, gravel, and soil amendments.”

“The design of this project went far beyond repairing storm damage. It has effectively provided a mechanism to reduce the volume and velocity of runoff, reclaimed water and created an important environmental asset that serves multiple functions,” added Bobby.

Green infrastructure offers an integrated solution to stormwater management, solving problems and providing benefits at the same time. This includes reducing pollutants and localized flooding, conserving water, and increasing property and economic value through improved site aesthetics and performance.

To learn more about ELM’s green infrastructure program, or ways to address water usage by reducing demands for supplemental irrigation through smart water management, contact Bruce Moore Jr. at 203.315.5433

Wildflowers Are Transforming Former Corporate Plazas.

Corporate America has jumped on the perennial bandwagon, says Josh Thermer, area manager for Eastern Land Management. A former golf course superintendent from Lake Preston, CT, who joined ELM in September 2021, he now leads ELM’s turf-to-meadow conversion program, in addition to overseeing procurement for all plant material and turf and ornamental products out of ELM’s Monroe office.

To Josh, there is no irony in promoting meadows during April’s Lawn Care month, as lawns and turf grass, like all plant material, are in a constant state of renewal.

“Landscapes are naturally transformative,” says Josh. “From converting worn-out concrete plazas to an expanse of wildflowers to replacing underperforming turf with native grasses to swapping out thirsty plants for drought tolerant perennials, it’s all about doing what’s best for the aesthetics of the site, the needs of the client, and the health and performance of the environment overall.”

Perennials are a trend worth keeping, especially given the challenges Connecticut has faced with drought. Meadows, prairie-plantings, naturalistic landscapes, and eco-lawns are all versions of an ecological revolution that improves soil health and groundwater, and reduces the need for toxic chemicals. When the soil is healthy, it sequesters carbon, which, in turn, is climate-positive—a win-win for companies seeking to improve their sustainability, ESG and LEED metrics.

“Improving the way we conserve water, and the way we improve the way people experience the outdoors is what we do. But we’re also improving the quality of corporate life and view meadows as a tenant amenity. Sitting in a gazebo and watching pollinators and birds is more relaxing than sitting on a bench and looking at a lawn devoid of wildlife because nothing’s blooming,” Josh adds.

Currently Josh is on point for several major corporate projects and landscape transformations deferred by Covid. An expert in sports and performance turf, he says he looks forward to working with college and university athletic directors looking to up their game.

For questions on lawn care turf conversions, meadows or athletic fields, contact Josh at 203-316-5433.

 

 

 

Landscape Staging is an Investment with Multiple Returns. Let’s start with flowers.

From high school seniors seeking an academic environment that supports campus life to parents looking for proof that their tuition dollars are well spent, nothing says ‘welcome’ and ‘value’ faster than a first impression.

Whether it’s campus tours, commencement, first day of school, or a photo shoot for marketing, landscape upgrades are the first line of defense when it comes to putting your campus’ best face forward.

ELM is an experienced partner at creating and sustaining exceptional outdoor spaces, and for nearly 50 years, has built a portfolio of expertise relied on to make your campus feel less like an institution and more like home.

10 ways to improve ROI:

    • Detailed flowers and beds
    • Annual / seasonal flowering plant combinations in school colors
    • Fresh mulch and compost
    • Shrub and small tree pruning
    • Recontouring dated and worn-out areas to freshen and revitalize
    • Infrastructure upgrades, stormwater and groundwater filtration improvements to reduce puddling, erosion and mud, and improve pedestrian safety.
    • Environmental improvements to meet master plan sustainability goals
    • Water management and conservation performance improvements
    • Revitalize athletic fields, donor-named buildings, theater courtyards, academic halls and common areas
    • Outdoor learning centers, classrooms, and event space

A well-maintained college campus helps raise enrollment. But it takes a dedicated commitment and skilled teams to keep grounds and landscape amenities at the highest standards.

For educational facilities looking to supplement inhouse landscape efforts or looking at outsourcing, ELM has flexible options.  These include contracting for need-specific assignments, supplementing and supporting in-house efforts, providing additional services for special events, or taking over the work.

ELM is specialized is serving New England campus environments. From landscape enhancements and amenities to full-service grounds support, water management and snow and ice removal, we are a strong commercial landscaping program for colleges and universities seeking cost-efficient and sustainable performance improvements.

For more information, contact Bruce Moore Jr, at 203-316-5433.

Photo: College of Health Professions, Center for Healthcare Education, Sacred Heart University, Fairfield, Connecticut.

 

ELM Expands into Westchester County NY, Opens Third Branch in Armonk

Eastern Land Management is pleased to announce the opening of a new service facility in Armonk, New York.

The facility will serve as a hub to more effectively allocate resources for landscape and snow services across Westchester County’s commercial sectors, including office, retail, industrial hospitality, health care, and education. “By continually evolving our business and transforming how we engage with our commercial real estate clients, we’re creating opportunities to significantly improve how we create value in the decades ahead,” said Bruce Moore Jr., ELM president.

“Landscape firms have a huge role to play in improving the environment. We understand that with the growing demand to be more climate-positive, we need to work with business leaders who are  also looking for ways to translate sustainability into action. This means working together to find better ways to reduce risk, improve water conservation, and use technology to achieve greener outcomes.” ~ Bruce Moore Jr., President

ELM was founded in Stamford, Connecticut and has helped maximize portfolio value for the property and facility community of Connecticut and the greater New York metro area, including Manhattan and Westchester County, since 1976.

ELM is an active member of the Westchester County BOMA, Southern Connecticut BOMA, Bridgeport Regional Economic Development Task Force, and in 2019, received a ChangeMaker Award from Fairfield County for its efforts in conservation.

Bruce Moore Jr. is a recognized impact partner in his community and active on boards and non-profits. ELM received an Industry Leadership Award from Lawn & Landscape magazine in 2018, and multiple awards over the years from the National Association of Landscape Professionals for its excellence in commercial landscaping.

To learn more, contact Bruce Moore, Jr. at (203) 316-5433.

Christopher Koenig Joins ELM as Area Manager

West Haven, Connecticut native Chris Koenig says the green industry is a perfect fit for him because he’s loved the outdoors since he was a kid.

With passions ranging from ice hockey to ice fishing, Chris is well-positioned to lead Eastern Land Management’s cold weather crews on ice and snow management, in addition to his role advancing service delivery to ELM clients throughout Fairfield County.

Chris’s journey to area manager began at the ground level, as a gardener. “The cutting edge of what we do as landscapers starts with the soil. Getting our hands dirty, nurturing and improving plant health, dealing with insects and the weather, and making sure all the dots connect on everybody’s needs. Front line ‘boots-on-the-ground’ work is a tough assignment. But it’s great on-the-job training,” said Chris.

Chris has held several landscaping positions over a dozen years, from field operations to production and customer service.  “Chris’ experience is inspiring,” said company president, Bruce Moore Jr. “When people work their way up, they can be phenomenal leaders. Chris’ crews respect his understanding of their jobs and customers value his impressive impact as a problem-solver.”

Please join us in welcoming Chris to ELM.

Leading From the Heart

Our company’s core reason for being is to be a force for good. Whether it’s creating value by giving back to our communities or strengthening our environmental stewardship or finding new ways to channel innovation, our success ultimately depends on the quality of the impact we have on the world around us.

As ELM expands its vision to make what we do more meaningful, eight things have become part of our organization’s practice:

  • We’re addressing environmental stewardship to reduce costs, improve water efficiency and soil health, and paying attention to improving biodiversity and minimizing waste.
  • We’re investing in ways to play a leading role in our snow and landscape industry’s transition to a lower-carbon economy.
  • We’re approaching environmental risk and reduced impacts by a combination of improved snow and landscape practices that protect and conserve water and natural resources.
  • We’re rethinking our operational footprint with an eye to a clean energy future.
  • We’re partnering across our communities with organizations and stakeholders that share our sense of commitment and accountability to positive impact.
  • We’re helping our workforce link their passions and strengths through training and opportunity.
  • We’re making the impact of our work more visible in the community.
  • We’re building a culture that values purpose, brings enthusiasm and collaboration to work, and and keeps purpose at the top of everyone’s mind, every day.

We are grateful for the people at ELM who go above and beyond to make a difference in the lives of others; for the culture of appreciation that is the backbone of our workplace, and to our clients and friends whose well-being, energy and engagement continue to inspire our path forward.

To learn more about ELM’s commitment to build a company that makes a difference, contact President Bruce Moore Jr. at (203) 316-5433.

 

 

 

 

Bruce Moore Jr. Joins First County Bank as Corporator

First County Bank, headquartered in Stamford, Connecticut, has named Bruce Moore Jr., president, Eastern Land Management, to its board of corporators.

The position of corporator is offered to community representatives and thought leaders who bring direct insights into the needs of business.

In this role, Bruce will join a unique group of community leaders with diverse backgrounds who together will play a critical role as centers of influence.

“Doing more together is a key pillar of ELM’s culture and community engagement is where it starts,” said Bruce.  “As landscape professionals, we’re trained to develop a deep understanding of broader needs. I look forward to collaborating with this remarkable group to increase the visibility of our business community, drive social impact and support the bank’s commitment to the needs of its customers.”

Eastern Land Management (ELM) serves the commercial real estate industry throughout Connecticut and Greater New York Metro. The company was founded in Stamford, Connecticut, in 1976 by Bruce Moore Sr. Bruce Moore Jr. became president in 2019. ELM received the ChangeMaker Award from Fairfield County in 2019 for its action on sustainability.

Bruce graduated with a degree in business management from Curry College in Milton, Massachusetts, and is active in the greater business and commercial real estate community.

About First County Bank

First County Bank, headquartered in Stamford, CT for 170 years, is an independent mutual community bank with 16 branches in Stamford, Norwalk, Darien, Greenwich, Fairfield, New Canaan and Westport offering deposit products, mortgages, wealth management, business banking services, and a full array of digital banking products including mobile and online banking. First County Bank has more than 220 employees, assets in excess of $1.9 billion and is a winner of the Hearst Connecticut Top Work Places 2020-2021 award. For additional information, please visit www.firstcountybank.com, or follow us @Firstcountybank on FacebookInstagramTwitter, and LinkedIn.

 

 

 

 

ELM Rolls Out Landscape Platform for Senior Living

A new health care model is reshaping senior living as residential communities continue to raise the bar on amenities and innovation that improve the quality of life.

As this property market looks to a future where the population of seniors with incremental health care needs is growing, updating facility landscaping for aesthetics, and health and safety are no longer capital expenditures that can be put on hold.

ELM has identified five ways to prioritize improvements.

  • Update entrances and pedestrian areas for safety and flow
  • Create plant-filled, interactive outdoor spaces to heighten community engagement, support walking and fitness programs, and add curb appeal
  • Identify opportunities to transform underperforming areas into low-maintenance nature or activity spaces for bocce ball, croquet or putting greens.
  • Create a community garden, rooftop top garden, a composting center, or rain garden to create more opportunities for residents to engage over shared activities.
  • Create a tech-enabled, environmentally-friendly, resource-efficient and climate appropriate landscape maintenance program that reduces long-term costs and use practices that conserve water, energy, and soil health, limit waste and protect groundwater.

ELM’s team is experienced in this sector and understands its unique needs. Recently, we performed a complete makeover that included the installation a digitally controlled smart irrigation system, the natural pruning of dozens of shrubs and trees, layers of fresh mulch, splashes of seasonal color, and a refreshed entrance.

Enhancement Manager and project lead, Bobby Papotto, says, “Our connection with nature improves well-being and nowhere is this more important that when it comes to the specific needs of senior living residents, whether the facility is for independent living, assisted living or memory care. To make sure our landscapes support a range of quality of life goals, we look at soil health, plant material, biodiversity and habitat, and incorporate as much nature and natural elements, and safety features into the design and execution as possible.”

Landscaped spaces are an oasis for community engagement and safe socializing, and spending time in a healthy outdoor environment can make all the difference when it comes to choosing a senior community.

To learn more about ways landscaping can create an enhanced sense of community, contact ELM President, Bruce Moore Jr., at 203-316-5433.

 

 

Wow-Worthy Containers are Welcoming Employees Back to Work

After a year of change and transition, property owners and managers are using flowers – and lots of them – to restore a sense of normalcy as tenants and workers return to the office.

Outdoor planters with cascading greenery, sensational pots of fall foliage, freshly mulched borders of mums, and impeccable outdoor green spaces are a sign that life is gradually finding its way back.

Although the impact of hybrid work will be felt across all aspects of the workplace for some time, investments made in bringing more nature into the workspace will be one of the healthiest legacies of the pandemic era.

Research suggests that plants, in or out of the office, are more than a decorative touch. In fact, across high performing buildings and green-certified offices, nature equals higher productivity, improved morale, and an increased ability to focus.

As the return-to-work workplace continues to evolve, ELM will continue to innovate with plants and sustainable landscape strategies that improve well-being and meet the demand for healthier environments.

To learn more about green workplaces and how landscape amenities attract and keep tenants, contact President, Bruce Moore Jr. @ 203-316-5433

 

Cool Boules! It’s Game-On for Bocce Ball

Outdoor game courts are going in faster than we can say “baci”. And whether you play French-style pétanque, British bowls or Italian bocce, the simple bowling game that some say dates back to 5,200 B.C. is a hip, hot and happening trend for corporate campuses with outdoor space to spare.

Lucky for us, ELM has a growing game court niche, having built more than a few over the last few years, with more bocce projects in the pipeline. Enhancement Project Manager Bobby Papotto, who oversees our game court portfolio, says that a bocce court is easy to set up and there are different design features to take into consideration.

A recent example is ELM’s installation of a landscaped bocce court at a global headquarters in Fairfield County, Connecticut—a two-part campus renovation project that included drainage and grading, boundary construction and material installation, plus tree-shaded seating space, and border plantings to encourage employee team-building, as well as provide an upscale amenity area for corporate events.

ELM has a long history of constructing, renovating, resurfacing, re-turfing, and repairing performance and athletic fields, and sport courts are a natural next step, says Bobby.

For this project specifically, materials included constructing 200 linear feet of concrete curb, installing 400 yards of topsoil and over 10,000 square feet of sod; planting maple trees, ornamental grasses, red twig Dogwoods, and designing and installing a high-tech irrigation system.

As Connecticut’s top-performing companies continue their rapid growth, it’s becoming more important than ever for Class A property owners and managers to re-energize workplaces with healthy amenities designed to enhance people’s lives.

Whether the enhancement is a recreation pavilion, a landscaped gathering place, or outdoor conference space, giving executive teams and employees camaraderie and well-time outside the office is not only good for company culture and recruiting—bocce, volleyball, basketball, and walking and biking trails, give employees the next best way to build sweat equity.

To learn more about ways ELM is integrating nature into the future of work, contact ELM President Bruce Moore Jr. at 203-316-5433.