Are You Caught in a Tug of War Over Summer Landscape Improvements?

Part of being a successful property manager is making your property more valuable. 

The good news is that landscape improvements can help you do that. Class A properties, retail and mixed-use can all benefit from landscape upgrades that drive asset value – through better watershed and habitat health, pedestrian access, hardscape repairs – and generate income, either through green credits, or increased occupancy and traffic.

If you are looking to boost your property’s ROI, aesthetics or functionality, consider the following:

1. Safety Value – Maintenance care prevents injury. Improved pedestrian walkways, parking lot surfaces, and structural pruning to improve visibility can all prevent trips, falls, accidents, and mitigate liability and risk. Strategic use of plant material can prevent flooding; drainage improvements can improve the absorption of rainwater and runoff; and tree-covered areas can reduce loitering – while also improving air quality. 

2. Health Value – Landscapes have direct impact on positive well-being. Healthy landscapes start with healthy soil and the reduction or elimination of toxic chemicals. For tenants, employees, guests, or customers, the quality of your property’s landscape influences how people interact with, and feel good about, your business. An attractive outdoor space, with courtyards and well-designed landscaped areas is advantageous to you as an employer and as an asset manager. We recommend investing in a regular plant health care program that creates a healthy baseline for your plants and trees, nourishes your soil and encourages vigorous bloom and vibrant foliage. 

3. Environmental Value – Conservation helps the earth and your wallet. Eco-friendly investments in green technology will improve your landscape’s water use and your cost through controlled irrigation and water audits; more trees contribute to using less heating or cooling energy; rain garden strategies and bioswales provide filters for stormwater and prevent flooding and puddling; flowering plants provide forage and habitat for pollinator insects, birds and wildlife. 

First things first. Prioritizing improvements is a task made easier by a master landscape maintenance plan.Knowing which improvement will offer sustained ROI depends on a few factors. One is the size of your property, the other is how it is used—where people gather, what types of amenities drive the greatest appreciation, and where fitness and pedestrian areas can be enhanced for greater health, i.e., walking and jogging trails, bike paths, bocce ball courts, green roofs, terrace and outdoor eating and meeting areas.

ELM’s top ten. Repairing walkways and footpaths impacted by winter storms, fencing/retaining walls, signage, water features, park-like amenities, new plantings and installation projects, turf aeration and plant health care, tree and shrub pruning, and power washing.

If you’re ready to take advantage of ELM’s summer landscape improvement and hardscape restoration expertise, perk up your high impact focal areas with bold containers and lots of color; swap out underperforming turf for perennial meadows; try our new and improved plant health program (and its organic option), upgrade your irrigation system with green technology, or partner with us to drive LEED credits, but don’t know where to begin, contact Bruce Moore Jr. at 203-316-5433.

A Winter Readiness Checklist

Winter in New England is no fun if you manage commercial real estate. Brutal winter weather and longer-than-normal seasons can cause interruptions in service and exponential concerns for tenant and employee safety. ELM knows that facilities large and small depend on proactive measures in order to stay open for business and keep parking lots and pavements liability-free.

Our 10-step playbook for winter ensures your safety:

  1. Keeping our professional commercial equipment in quality condition and using specialized machinery that delivers versatility, functionality, and safety.
  2. Implementing snow and ice control practices that establish priorities for how removal is accomplished.
  3. Choosing appropriate and sustainable ice melting options, liquid chloride-free products, and salting strategies that balance environmental responsibility with cost, utility, temperatures and conditions.
  4. Having a risk management, snow and ice removal plan in place to assure that commercial properties have adequate protection for weather events.
  5. Eliminating slip, trip and falls on sidewalks and pavements by keeping sidewalks, parking lots and ADA access ramps free of snow and ice accumulation.
  6. Evaluating drainage issues and wet walking surfaces across pedestrian areas.
  7. Deploying a highly-trained ELM snow team led by SIMA (Snow and Ice Management Association)-certified advanced snow professionals and equipment operators who practice emergency drills and train in the off-season.
  8. Using proprietary weather forecasting software to assist in anticipating dangerous storm conditions and clean-up needs.
  9. Having an emergency storm response team available 24/7.
  10. Having a communications plan to provide you with critical guidance when needed.

ELM is proud to be named one of Snow Magazine’s snow leaders for 2018, and proud, too, of our commitment to the professional organizations that drive continuous learning and improvement: Snow and Ice Management Association, the Accredited Snow Contractors of America, and community-wide business councils throughout Fairfield County, Connecticut, where we can be an advocate for landscape and grounds safety.

For information on ELM’s snow operations policies, programs or risk management protocols, contact President, Bruce Moore, Jr. at 203-316-5433.

 

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What Do Tenants Want?

According to a number of studies on millennials and the changing needs of the next-gen workplace, employers who want to recruit and retain top talent, and building managers who want to lease to and retain high quality tenants, the answer is: health, wellness and amenities.

Chief among these is the need to think about features that increase social connections.  Healthier people are happier people and data suggests that nature plays a strong role in contributing to both. Plants, trees, and foliage offset negative impacts from poor building air and light systems; bike paths and nature trails foster fitness, and converted outdoor workspaces wired for Wi-Fi boost productivity and engagement. Rooftop gardens with lounge areas and recreational areas give people a chance to freshen their perspective.

“A lot of these approaches are already part of strategic landscape thinking,” said Bruce Moore Jr, president of ELM and an advocate for landscapes that impact healthier lifestyles. “The demand exists, it’s just a matter of understanding that most of the amenities can be added for relatively low cost once the infrastructure is in place.”

Some of the best ways to introduce more green features include transforming loading docks to landscaped walkways, opening up interiors for large planted atriums that bring in natural light, and green walls – vertical plantings and living art forms that extends the building’s brand.

LEED designations, WELL-certifications, and corporate sustainability goals are reviving interest in finding better ways to create a bridge between the built and landscaped environment. Green roofs, in particular, with roof decks, lounge areas, putting greens and bocce ball courts, are thriving in urban business corridors and emerging bedroom communities where corporate HQs, redeveloped commercial properties, and aging office parks are being turned into highly desirable office space.

Workplace amenities that attract people, attract business.  “With blurred lines between personal and professional lives impacting everyone, workplaces no longer exist merely for career paths,” said Moore. “Adding nature into the equation ups the ante to create better places to live, work and play overall.”

That, and the case for the business benefits of a sustainable footprint, whether on the roof or on the ground. “People today expect more: property managers and owners want return on investment, employees want features they can use, and investors want to spend less for more.”

To learn more about tenant amenities and green roofs, updating your Class A property landscape or making your Class B property more competitive, contact ELM President, Bruce Moore Jr. at 203-316-5433.

Photo: The green roof at The Cooper-Union in Manhattan was revitalized by ELM to include lounge areas, a bocce ball court, and reception and entertaining space.

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Bruce Moore Sr. Honored with Landscape Industry Leadership Award

ELM Founder and CEO, Bruce Moore Sr., is a recipient of Lawn & Landscape magazine’s 2018 Leadership Award.

The awards were given at an October 17 media event held in conjunction with LANDSCAPES2018, the National Association of Landscape Professionals (NALP) annual conference and expo held in Louisville, Kentucky.

With more than 40 years in the landscaping industry, Bruce Moore Sr. continues to be great friend to colleagues and clients, an inspiration to countless ELM employees, and a shining light in his community as a volunteer, philanthropist, and payer of all things forward.

To learn more about Bruce’s four-plus decades of service and leadership, go to:  October Lawn & Landscape Moore to Give

Photo:  Editor Brian Horn and Bruce Moore Sr.

 

 

Bruce Moore Sr., Receives Snow Industry Leadership Award

In an award ceremony held at the Sonesta Resort on Hilton Head Island, ELM Founder and CEO Bruce Moore Sr. was inducted into the snow industry leadership class of 2018.

Under Bruce’s leadership, ELM has more than doubled in size and currently supports a seasonal crew of 150 safety and risk management professionals dedicated to emergency storm response, proactive snow and ice and winter services.

Eastern Land Management serves the commercial real estate industry as an all-season value chain partner throughout Fairfield County, Connecticut and greater metropolitan New York.

Read more about Bruce’s incredible leadership journey in “Snow Pro”, an article featured in the September 2018 issue of Snow Magazine

 

 

 

Jessica Braz Named ELM Controller

Eastern Land Management is pleased to announce that Jessica Braz has been promoted to Controller.

“Jessica joined ELM in 2009 as an accountant and moved through the ranks, earning our respect as one of our best problem solvers,” said Bruce Moore, Jr., vice president of operations.  “Throughout her tenure, she has demonstrated fiduciary leadership and we’re proud to include her on our management team.”

In her new role, she will be responsible for the preparation of company financial statements and supervision of accounts payable specialists and accounting staff.

A native of Winnipeg, Canada, Jessica moved to New England to attend the University of Connecticut, where she graduated with a B.S. degree in Corporate and Organizational Studies. When not “crunching numbers”, she says the most important other thing she does is to be a mom to her two girls and, with her husband, invest in their future.

“We enable and empower our employees, like Jessica and others with young families, to manage the demands of the job with the responsibilities of home and community. In this, we hope to continue building an organizational culture that makes work-life balance possible for everyone and makes ELM a great place to work,” added Bruce.

Eastern Land Management provides commercial landscape services throughout Southern Connecticut and the New York metropolitan area.

easternland.com

203.316.5433

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Specifications: Working for You and Your Landscape, or … Not?

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 Find yourself in discussions (or arguments) on how you and landscape services providers “interpret” portions of your spec? Find your site is “settling” for something in-between what you wanted and what the provider bid? When was the last time you updated your landscape maintenance specifications? If it’s been more than four-to-five years – your landscape has been growing and changing, so shouldn’t your spec change too?

Continue reading “Specifications: Working for You and Your Landscape, or … Not?”

GameChangers in Fairfield and Westchester Coming Soon!

 

 Westchester & Fairfield GameChangers – Coming Soon!

 

How did they change the real estate landscape?

What were the obstacles?

What’s planned for the future?

Come meet the experts!

 

Anytime industry leaders and visionaries share their expertise and insight, it’s a vital learning opportunity not to be missed.  ELM is pleased to be a sponsor and invites you to join us at the upcoming GameChangers panel discussion, followed by your opportunity to ask questions of the distinguished experts.

 

We look forward to seeing you in Rye on Sept 17th or Darien on the 18th.  Please click on the below link to learn more and register.

http://westfaironline.com/game-changers/